Increased Risk of Cognitive Impairment in Children with Cochlear Implants
Healthy Living

Increased Risk of Cognitive Impairment in Children with Cochlear Implants

Authored by DesiMD Doctor on 25 May 2014 - 23:08

A new study reveals that children who have received cochlear implant for suffering from profound deafness showed a pattern of cognitive impairment, a process of learning perceiving and remembering.

A team of researchers from the Indiana University have found how children having cochlear implants have five times the risk of delays in working memory areas of the brain and have problems in conceptual planning and learning.

The researchers took in 73 children who had undergone cochlear implants before the age of 7, and 78 children who had normal hearing, and studied them for their deficits in daily functioning. Careful observation revealed that around one-third to one-half of the children having cochlear implants had problems in concept formation, controlled attention and planning and memory issues.

"This is really innovative work," co-author David B. Pisoni, Ph.D., director of the Speech Research Laboratory in the IU Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, explained. "Almost no one has looked at these issues in these children. Most audiologists, neuro-otologists, surgeons and speech-language pathologists -- the people who work in this field -- focus on the hearing deficit as a medical condition and have been less focused on the important discoveries in developmental science and cognitive neuroscience." Dr. Pisoni also is a Chancellors' Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at IU Bloomington. 

While there is no clear link as such to understand the connection between these implants and cognitive functioning, researchers speculate that it may be the time of implantation- earlier implantation may bring about greater risks of cognitive impairment.

"We are now looking for early markers in children who are at risk before they get implants," Dr. Pisoni added. "It will be beneficial to identify as early as possible which children might be at risk for poor outcomes, and we need to understand the variability in the outcome and what can be done about it." A new study reveals that children who have received cochlear implant for suffering from profound deafness showed a pattern of cognitive impairment, a process of learning perceiving and remembering.

A team of researchers from the Indiana University have found how children having cochlear implants have five times the risk of delays in working memory areas of the brain and have problems in conceptual planning and learning.

The researchers took in 73 children who had undergone cochlear implants before the age of 7, and 78 children who had normal hearing, and studied them for their deficits in daily functioning. Careful observation revealed that around one-third to one-half of the children having cochlear implants had problems in concept formation, controlled attention and planning and memory issues.

"This is really innovative work," co-author David B. Pisoni, Ph.D., director of the Speech Research Laboratory in the IU Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, explained. "Almost no one has looked at these issues in these children. Most audiologists, neuro-otologists, surgeons and speech-language pathologists -- the people who work in this field -- focus on the hearing deficit as a medical condition and have been less focused on the important discoveries in developmental science and cognitive neuroscience." Dr. Pisoni also is a Chancellors' Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at IU Bloomington. 

While there is no clear link as such to understand the connection between these implants and cognitive functioning, researchers speculate that it may be the time of implantation- earlier implantation may bring about greater risks of cognitive impairment.

"We are now looking for early markers in children who are at risk before they get implants," Dr. Pisoni added. "It will be beneficial to identify as early as possible which children might be at risk for poor outcomes, and we need to understand the variability in the outcome and what can be done about it." 

 

References:

Indiana University School of Medicine

JAMA Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery

 

*Disclaimer: This is not medical advice. The content is for educational purposes only. Please contact your doctor for any health care issues.