Personalized Diets Help Fight Obesity and Diabetes: Study
Healthy Living

Personalized Diets Help Fight Obesity and Diabetes: Study

Authored by DesiMD Doctor on 21 Nov 2015 - 12:56

obesity-food

Have you ever thought why two people who eat the same food, one loses weight and other does not? Even if everyone ate the same meals, the effect would differ from one person to another, because of metabolism.

Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel, recommend personalized diet plans to help people identify the foods they must eat, to accomplish their health goals. The findings of this new study are published in the Cell Journal.

Study author Eran Segal and Eran Elinav, Department of Immunology, followed the blood sugar levels of 800 individuals for more than a week and discovered that the GI (Glycemic Index) of any given food is not a set value; it simply depends on the individual.

Study Findings:  As expected, researchers found that age and BMI (body mass index) were linked with blood glucose levels after meals. On the other hand data also discovered that different people showed immensely different responses to the same food, despite the fact that their individual responses did not change from day-to-day.

"Measuring such a large cohort without any prejudice really enlightened us on how inaccurate we all were about one of the most basic concepts of our existence, which is what we eat and how we integrate nutrition into our daily life, In contrast to our current practices, tailoring diets to the individual may allow us to utilize nutrition as means of controlling elevated blood sugar levels and its associated medical conditions," said Elinav.

Reference: Personalized nutrition by prediction of glycemic responses, Zeevi et al., Cell, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2015.11.001, published 19 November 2015; Weizmann Institute of Science news release, accessed 16 November 2015

*Disclaimer: This is not medical advice. The content is for educational purposes only. Please contact your doctor for any health care issues.